MANI TRAVELS IN THE SOUTHERN PELOPONNESE PDF

Editorial Reviews. Review. “[Mani and Roumeli are] two of the 20th Centuries most celebrated travel books” — Independent on Sunday From the Mani. Buy Mani: Travels in the Southern Peloponnese by Patrick Leigh Fermor (ISBN: ) from Amazon’s Book Store. Everyday low prices and free. This is Patrick Leigh Fermor’s spellbinding part-travelogue, part inspired evocation of a part of Greece’s past. Joining him in the Mani, one of Europe’s wildest.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Mani by Patrick Leigh Fermor. The Mani, at the tip of Greece’s-and Europe’s-southernmost promontory, is one of the most isolated regions of the world. Cut off from the rest of the country by the towering range of the Taygetus and hemmed in by the Aegean and Ionian seas, it is a land where the past is still very much a part of its people’s daily lives.

Patrick Leigh Fermor, who has been described pelopoonnese “a c The Mani, at the tip of Greece’s-and Europe’s-southernmost promontory, is one of the most isolated regions of the world. Patrick Leigh Fermor, who has been described as “a cross between Indiana Jones, James Bond, and Graham Greene,” bridges the genres of adventure story, travel writing, and memoir to reveal an ancient world living alongside the twentieth century.

Mani: Travels in the Southern Peloponnese – Wikipedia

Here, in the book that confirmed his reputation as one of the English language’s finest writers of prose, Patrick Leigh Fermor carries the reader with him on travsls journeys among the Greeks of the mountains, exploring their history and time-honored lore.

Mani is a companion volume to Patrick Leigh Fermor’s celebrated Roumeli: Travels in Northern Greece. Paperbackpages. Duff Cooper Prize To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Maniplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Jul 19, Geoff rated it it was amazing.

On the trail of Patrick Leigh Fermor in Greece

View all 36 comments. Jul 26, Bruce rated it it was amazing.

To lie in a hammock in the north woods watching the sky – cobalt, cirrus, gull-etched – and feel its gentle sway, to listen to the twitter of songbirds and the chatter of gray squirrels, to watch the rippling of the lake and hear its soughing on the shore, and, above all, to accompany all of traels with the reading of peloponnede limpid prose of Patrick Leigh Fermor is summer paradise indeed.

I just now finished it, rtavels rarely has a book given me such pleasure. The Maniots are isolated, in a sense provincial, and fiercely independent. They are also vivid, unique, and hospitable.

And this book relates the travels of Patrick and Joan through this region, describing the geography, the history, and the people as they encounter them. Reading Leigh Fermor, I find, is a bit like reading Herodotus on a more intimate scale.

Souhhern Fermor skillfully and knowledgeably integrates recent history with classical history and mythology, making the life and reality of this sourhern portion of Greece come alive and imprinting it indelibly on the mind of the grateful and delighted reader. I have personally experienced the Peloponnese only on a soutyern trip out of Athens – Mycenae, Epidaurus – and would now like to experience much more. Scrubby vegetation, hazy azure seas stretching into the distance, and rock. Rock, which from a distance imitates the gnarled above-ground roots of a venerable aged English Oak, Quercus robur.

More of the ilk of the golden orb of the noon-day raising the literary temperature at the turn of souhhern page? Just what the travel agent ordered. Overloaded, muddling one Greek God with another, I was losing sight of the wood for the trees; let alone the rocks for the water … and the entrance to Hades beckoned pp.

My own general reading in this area has been considerably more plebian: Whole villages, towers, and landscapes came and went like Brigadoon. What border there may have been between Mani and the Deep Mani degenerated into a game of discerned guessing.

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Too frequently such cartographic reduction in excellence left me disorientated and adrift; not knowing what compass bearing I was on; let alone quite how far or near the next village was, and the contour lines to be climbed, with or without rope. What then would he have made of my reading in a British broadsheet last weekend, of the published itinerary of a cruise ship calling in at Mani. Such is the nature of bargains struck in hope and calculated expectation of reducing the brittleness of once a slender thread of life.

Ideally both would be bound in the same volume. View all 4 comments. Apr 16, Jim rated it it was amazing Shelves: If there is a Pantheon of travel writers, I should think that Patrick Leigh Fermor should rank near the top, alongside H. Lawrence, Norman Douglas, and Lawrence Durrell. Fermor is famous for paragraphs, sentences, and long rolling lists that the reader never wants to come to the end of.

Try this one on for size: There, by the Golden Gate, in the heart of a mi If there is a Pantheon of travel writers, I should think that Patrick Leigh Fermor should rank near the top, alongside H. There, by the Golden Gate, in the heart of a mighty concourse, waited the lords of Byzantium: There is in Fermor a joy in the fusty details of history, geography, and myth.

One suddenly encounters a footnote that stands isolated like a sapphire found in the woodpile, such as the basis for claim by the Duc de Nevers to the Byzantine throne in the early seventeenth century: The marquisate passed to her second son, the Despot Theodore Porphyrogennetos, and continued in the male line of Montferrat-Palaeologue for six generations and then devolved on an only daughter of Boniface de Montferrat who married Frederigo Gonzaga, Duke of Nevers, a scion of the great Mantuan house, who begat Duke Charles II, the claimant in question.

He planned, with the help of the other powers, to raise the entire Balkan peninsula in revolt. The help never came and the ambitious scheme faded away. That man can talk on for another six hundred pages.

Spider webs would connect me to the chair I was sitting in, but the brightness of my eyes would be undiminished.

One final quote, just to demonstrate why the five stars I gave this book are not enough: When you consider the part of Greece that he described, a desolate peninsula stretching south from the Peloponnese and separating the Ionian from the Adriatic Rtavels, it is amazing that Fermor could hold the reader’s interest mano such surpassing ease. Parenthetical chapters on such topics peloponnwse myths and Greek icons could stand alone as essays.

I can probably go on forever, but what would be the point? This is a very wonderful book, and it casts a magical sothern on the reader. Nov 06, Andrew added it Shelves: After reading Fermor’s writing on the backwoods of Central Europe, my next logical step was his writing on the backwoods of Greece, and they are just as glorious, although with less about classical history and more about the everyday of life and the strange connections to the wider world in this odd point on the periphery of the “West.

Strongly recommended for an After reading Fermor’s writing on the backwoods of Central Europe, my next logical step was his writing on the backwoods of Greece, and they ppeloponnese just as glorious, although with less about classical history and more about the everyday of life and the strange connections to the wider world in this odd point on the periphery of the “West.

Strongly recommended for anyone who southerh of a wineskin and a skewer of lamb cooked over open flame with oregano, and loves the odd connections between disparate places and times Nov 25, Michael rated it really liked it. Paddy Fermor was never a tourist and only sometimes a traveler.

For most of his journeying life particularly in Greecehe was a serial dweller, inhabiting the paths, fields, streams, seashores, villages, and cities that he encountered like a native.

Part of his comfort in discovering new places and people was due to his extraordinary facility with languages, but perhaps a greater part tge due to his genuine interest in and curiosity about the people and places he visited.

-&nbspidealinthewest Resources and Information.

He traveled in the s Paddy Fermor was never a tourist and only sometimes a traveler. He traveled in the same four dimensions we all do, but his fourth dimension was very deep. He lived in the eternal now, but that present was informed and enriched by history going back to the mythic past and by speculative fantasies that looked to a future that never was but might have been. At times though, he was overwhelmed by the depth of his knowledge soutuern launched into fascinating digressions on politics, ikons, demons, or cats.

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Whatever would not fit into the osuthern or the digressions, he wistfully deferred to a later book.

His style of writing is not for everyone, and many will be put off by his erudite and sometimes obscure vocabulary, his almost obsessive attention to detail, and his far-ranging interests that continually distracted him from the linear narrative. Jul 16, Sarah rated it really liked it Shelves: I started this ages ago on a bus skirting the Mani the spectacular Kalamata to Sparta road, passing the genuinely sinister spot where the Spartans abandoned their inadequate infants and read it in Mystras and Monemvasia, and put it aside, and read more months later on a late afternoon flight across the dusky blue hills of the Peloponnese.

And then it finished rather suddenly when I thought I had a lot more to go, because there is a comprehensive index at the end.

The approach to places is like I started this ages ago on a bus skirting the Mani the spectacular Kalamata to Sparta road, passing the genuinely sinister spot where the Spartans abandoned their inadequate infants and read it in Mystras and Monemvasia, and put it aside, and read more months later on a late afternoon flight across the dusky blue hills of the Peloponnese.

The approach to places is like Rebecca West’s in the sublime Black Lamb and Grey Falconmy dated and unreliable bible tautology alert in the Balkans: Fermor is similarly, confidently uneven and undoubtedly the most erudite person on the planet, and frankly large chunks of this were hard to follow. It is certainly intellectually, stylistically and socially exclusive, full, FULL, of obscure Balkan history and Corsica and Crete and god knows what else and I feel rather than know that there is material here about the Mani that is not anywhere else in any language.

I don’t feel I have properly consumed it, but there may be other summers in Greece to dip into it, if I’m lucky. Mani is the very southern part of Greece, an isolated peninsular surrounded by the Aegean and Ionian seas, and made more remote by the Taygettus mountain range.

It is a harsh environment too; precious little grows here because of its rugged and barren landscape. This isolation also means that the region has maintained much stronger links to its ancient past too.

The myths and legends of history feel so much more alive here than in other parts of Greece. The language harks back to old dialects, an Mani is the very southern part of Greece, an isolated peninsular surrounded by the Aegean and Ionian seas, and made more remote by the Taygettus mountain range. The language harks back to old dialects, and even thought the orthodox church has a strong influence, pagan and old habits still exist. Some of it is fascinating, in particular the reason that the towns are peppered with towers.

These are the remanats of the long battles that used to take place between the various families and people of the region, who all seemed to have a long term running vendettas. That is until the Turks turned up and suddenly they were all fighting the common enemy. The travel part is beautifully written, Fermor has a way with words that make what he is seeing so evocative and appealing. Jun 04, Tuck rated it really liked it Shelves: An Adventure this has a very nice intro by michael gorra, a handy map but you’ll need your atlas, really and good index.

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Travels in the Southern Peloponnese is still wonderful escapist stuff.